• Book Talk,  Uncategorized

    The Moonstone: How Wilkie Collins Popularized the Detective Genre

    It’s that time of year again where if you live anywhere other than the southern US, (Florida specifically in my case), then you’re probably starting to feel the first crispness of fall in the air. With the changing of the seasons certain genres immediately spring to mind and are reliably popular year after year. One of these is the mystery and detective genre. Whether you like spooky and grisly murder mysteries or cozy whodunits, many people find themselves reaching for these titles as they settle down by the fireside. There is something powerfully psychological, I believe, about autumn and winter that make us all more likely to retreat into ourselves…

  • Film and TV Reviews,  Uncategorized

    Julian Fellowes’ Dr. Thorne

        I have always been a big fan of period pieces and costume dramas, but my family and I have seen so many at this point it can often be a challenge to find one we haven’t seen. Recently, we sat down to watch Dr. Thorne, written by the inestimable Julian Fellowes on Amazon Prime, and we were quite delighted by this charming story! Trollope is actually one of the major Victorian authors whose work I still have yet to read, so I was completely unfamiliar with this story going into it. I feel that this actually enhanced the experience for me though, since I wasn’t able to predict or…

  • Book Talk,  Uncategorized

    Marriage, Class, and Love in Charlotte Bronte’s Shirley

    Many readers were no doubt first introduced to the Bronte sisters through either Emily Bronte’s novel, Wuthering Heights, or Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. I myself was no exception, and it is easy to see why these two iconic books have shaped what people think of when they think of a quintessential “Bronte novel,” since both conjure up images of windswept moors and thwarted lovers. (These books in particular are also by far the most popular because Anne’s works in years past were little read, and are only in the last decade or so gaining popularity.) Shirley then, at first glance, seems a different creature entirely. More akin to a smaller…

  • Uncategorized

    Wives and Daughters: Gaskell’s Influence in Victorian Literature

    Whew! I feel so happy with myself right now. This book that I am going to talk about today is one that has been on my to-be-read list for so long, and this finally was the year I read it. I have been familiar with Elizabeth Gaskell’s Wives and Daughters for several years now and have watched the beautiful costume mini-series created by Andrew Davies, (who has created countless stellar period pieces for the BBC), multiple times. I also have read Gaskell’s North and South, and watched its accompanying adaption, as well as Cranford. Overshadowed by her many peers, Elizabeth Gaskell is a fabulously underrated author who is only in…